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Marketing Post-Covid: Reenita Malhotra Hora, Head of Marketing & Communications, SRI International

Transcript

Brian Erickson:
Thanks for joining the Cardwell Beach Marketing Podcast. My name is Brian Erickson, Chief Strategy Officer, and partner at Cardwell Beach. In this series, we’re interviewing senior marketers across industries to develop perspective on what marketing will look like in a post-COVID-19 world, which now hopefully in the middle of the vaccine rollout, will be coming sooner than later. Today’s guest is Reenita Malhotra Hora, the Head of Marketing and Communications at SRI International, a nonprofit research center that advocates for innovation and research in technology. Reenita is also a founding partner of How Women Invest, an early-stage venture fund that pairs female investors with female founders. Reenita, thanks so much for joining us today.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Great to join you today, Brian. Thank you for having me on the show.
Brian Erickson:
Absolutely. So, weathering the storm, we were just talking offline here and we’re both very lucky that the majority of our woes are boredom and quarantine related more than anything else. But I guess on the business side, looking at moments of major change, it often brings about corresponding shifts in technology. And how has the COVID-19 pandemic, which has brought about so many personal and social changes for everyone, also changed the way that we approach technology?
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Well, you know, Brian, for the longest time, we have all been talking about work-life balance and working from home and the reality of that. And although several companies and organizations have done this successfully, to some extent, or to a large extent, not everybody had, at least not before the pandemic. Here at SRI International, where I work, we are a tech shop in the truest sense of the word. And even we had this culture of face time, right? By face time, I don’t mean FaceTime the app, I mean, actual face-to-face interactions. Stop by my office and come by my desk, and let’s meet at lunch in the lunchroom and chat about X, Y, and Z. All good and well, but I think we have truly, truly transitioned to video conferencing and specifically the Zoom life.

So across the board, we’ve seen Zoom Universities, Zoom schools, Zoom weddings, Zoom conferences, Zoom everything. And I really think that it is the norm now. And even if, as you say, we’re seeing some light at the end of the tunnel and we are coming out of this pandemic situation, hopefully, sooner rather than later, I don’t think Zoom is going to stop. So I think that culture will persist.
Brian Erickson:
For sure. And, I guess, talk a little bit about your work outside of SRI for a moment, in terms of how the pandemic has impacted things, and just the way that we’ve had to make so many shifts. So you serve as a funder and mentor for women founders, and there’s been much discussion throughout the COVID-19 pandemic about how women had often had to juggle demanding careers and childcare at the same time. How have you seen this moment affect the founders that you support?

Reenita Malhotra Hora:
That’s a great question, Brian. It’s very, very much a double-edged sword for women, female founders because, on one hand, this whole advent of video conferencing and Zoom has really given the woman complete freedom and flexibility to attend to the needs of her family, right? The kids are at home. There was pretty much nothing that could stop that. Children need the attention of their parents, both parents, right? And women sort of have so many responsibilities. It’s running the business, running the family, running the household, making sure that food is on the table, making sure that the day, everybody’s day actually, is organized, and the flow of everybody’s day works individually and collectively for the family. So having the ability to truly work out of the home has afforded her the flexibility to do all of this and to do it effectively, and to do it in a way such that if she needs to sort of take a break for half an hour and get out into the sunshine and take a walk, she can do that too.
So that has been great. But like I said, it’s a double-edged sword because the flip side of all of that, especially if you have younger children, and to some extent, children of all ages all the way up to high school even, is that they have needs. They need to stay on schedule. They need to be schooled. And school has gone from a traditional institution that they would walk to, or take the bus to, or be dropped off to in whatever way, shape, or form to sort of Zoom school or homeschool, which is in many ways easier said than done, right? There’s some kids who have taken to it. Other kids, many, many of them have absolutely not. And parents have had issues with this. The kids are unmotivated. They’re not getting things done. There are gaps in learning. And as mom, you need to attend to all of this.
It’s a huge challenge. How do you do this? And also run a company at the same time, or if you’re not running a company, work in a company, be a founder, right? It’s a huge challenge. You know where, much as we think of ourselves as these great, wonderful Indian goddesses with eight hands and eight arms, we’re not, practically. There is only so much we could do at a time. So again, like I said, double-edged sword. On one side, it’s been great. It’s afforded us the opportunity to do a lot. On the other side of the spectrum, it has its challenges. And I have seen this across the board with all of the great women founders that I work with.
Brian Erickson:
And you know, it’s not to say that, there are a number of different statistics looking at different aspects of this, right? But I think when you look at labor force numbers, four times as many women as men dropped out of the labor force in September 2020, and it’s just not divided fairly. And nearly half of men say they do most of the homeschooling and only 3% of women agree. I think we’re still kind of unfairly, and my wife would probably say myself included, not doing as good of a job as we can accommodating the modern way that we live. And I’m sure that has to be taxing for people who are starting on an already stressful path as a founder of a company.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Absolutely. I truly think that starting a company and being a founder of a startup is full of experiences that exist because you literally need to do everything. You’re starting this business, you’re looking for funding, you’re trying to establish a product or a service, define what that is, build a proof of concept, do the work, wear several hats and do the work of several different kinds of employees that you could have or would have had you the money to employ them. So it’s a lot of work. It’s a lot of work, and to do that as well as run and maintain the semblance of smooth family life, it’s tough, very tough.
Brian Erickson:
There are many studies about multitasking, right? And doing multiple different things at the same time. And that your mind can’t function as well across as many different tasks as you can divide it. And there was an implicit cost to task switching and especially very different sorts of tasks. I have three-and-a-half year-old twins. So I know some of those other tasks that I get sucked into in the middle of the day. That’s just, I think it’s definitely something that hasn’t been accounted for yet in society. And I guess as marketers and strategists in the technology industry, are there aspects of marketing that you’ve taken into account that, kind of, accommodate these sorts of shifts culturally and how our society is adapting? Has marketing changed as a result of the way that people are living their day-to-day lives and especially folks with children and mothers, particularly?
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Absolutely, Brian. So I think right before the pandemic, certainly there was this notion as we have touched on already, certainly at SRI where I work, that somebody from the marketing team needs to be in the office, right? Somebody needs to be there so that if somebody else in the Institute has a need, they can walk by and find someone to deal with whatever the request is. It’s not like, “oh, there’s no one here.” That situation just doesn’t exist anymore. The new norm is you work from anywhere. You don’t have to be at the venue, that venue being the office or the conference or the client’s site, or whatever it might be. You can work from anywhere. Loosely for most of us, that means working from home, but many of us have decided to sort of shift home, go travel, and sort of being in a different location and consider that home for a while and work from there, and that really is the new norm. I find this very interesting because there are some countries now I’m thinking of places in the Caribbean places like St Lucia and Barbados and Jamaica, which are actually offering work-from-visas. Inviting people to come and sort of stay there, enjoy the weather, perhaps enjoy the sea and the ocean life and work though, work doesn’t have to stop. So I think that really is the biggest change that has come into being the new normal that we are seeing, the fact that you can work from just about anywhere. The other aspect of that is that the live events, the live meetings, and the whiteboarding activities are challenged. And I specifically speak from the point of view of someone who works in tech. In technology companies, large and small, this whole idea of the team, getting together in a room, brainstorming, having a massive whiteboard session is actually very, very important.

They really feed off of the interaction with each other. This is probably because researchers and technologists, program developers, and so forth are people who will sort of go off and do their thing individually. So they really, when it comes to understanding what the problem is and defining the problem solving before they actually get to the operations of that, they really feed off of the fact that they can brainstorm and ideate with their team members. What I’m seeing and what I’m finding, what I’m seeing, activity doesn’t seem to be as effective, or perhaps the word is satisfying on Zoom. Even though there are plenty of software applications out there that afford and offer you, not afford, there are plenty of software applications out there that offer whiteboarding solutions or whiteboarding-type activities, right? But still. I’m finding that the researchers and the scientists and the technologists, they want to get into a room with the team, be face-to-face with them, be live with them, talk about X, Y, and Z, and go from, A to Z in terms of problem-solving on that whiteboard in person. That’s what they want.
Brian Erickson:
I mean, you just behave differently when you’re in the room with someone than when you are in a somewhat unnatural situation of even a phone call, video call, Zoom meeting, it’s much different for me, at least when I’m sitting in a room with my friends for multiple hours. I’ve never been on the phone, I don’t think, with any of them for more than 15 minutes, yet it’s totally natural and comfortable when you’re in person. And I think that definitely translates to a business situation too, where you’re there, you have to fill the space and fill the time with something. And a lot of good things can come out of that, for sure.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Absolutely. I mean, one of the things that’s not so talked about is that there’s actually an energy transfer, right? Situation in a room, sort of, when you look at the human body, you’ve got a certain temperature you emit and exude a certain energy that collectively, if you put two people together in a room, that actually raises the temperature of the room. So levels of energy, how that flows from one person to the next, how that affects the next person, these are things you can’t do on Zoom. And these are things that are obviously not talked about so much because we’re in a world right now, we’re trying to proactively encourage the Zoom habit, so to speak. So there are pluses and minuses of both sides of the equation, I would say.
Brian Erickson:For sure. So looking to the future, and obviously, a lot of this will persist culturally in terms of how we live for quite a while. I’m sure in certain aspects we’ll revert back. How is this impacting your marketing at SRI right now? And how do you see it changing your marketing in the future?-
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
How is it impacting us now? We have really shifted our focus from traditional marketing to digital marketing. Now in many, many ways, digital marketing was a large portion of our strategy anyway. I would say with the pandemic, however, it has truly shifted to being, I mean, I would say near 100%, near 100% of how we spend our marketing dollars. There’s a reason for this, right? Well, the primary reason was, well, we can’t go anywhere. So what do we do? What does that mean? That means our salespeople can’t go out on sales calls now in a traditional world, this would mean sort of that live event, right? Going to the customer sites, going to a conference, talking about the product-service mix, and trying to facilitate a deal live. We can’t do that. What is it that we can do?
We do have the opportunity at this point to be more marketing-oriented than sales-oriented. Of course, the two are closely related and one leads to the other, but certainly, we didn’t want to waste the time during the pandemic. We wanted to use this opportunity to basically showcase that product service mix to the customer. And I’d like to sort of talk about this highlight for a bit that organizations traditionally, what they’ll do is when resources are limited, the first area that they will cut is marketing, advertising, things like that. The pandemic really has shown that more and more people are searching for products and services online due to these social distancing laws. Digital agencies everywhere have highlighted a tremendous increase in search volumes across a wide range of industries, right? And there’s, the statistics are ridiculous. And some of them are seeing a 200-300% increase in online sales.
So online growth is really what businesses, in general, need to be altering their supply chains, too. Switching from selling products in bricks and mortar stores to selling products and services online. And this is the shift that certainly we have seen within SRI International when it comes to developing our marketing strategy. The world is digital. We’re focusing on blogs, videos, webinars, digital campaigns around those. And just to put it in terms of a very concrete example, this is our 75th year. We turned 75 years old in November and under ordinary circumstances, we were planning for a big party, right? An anniversary celebration where we would invite stakeholders and key customers, and of course our employees to really celebrate that occasion. It’s not happening. Instead, we are going to put dollars towards digital campaigns.
If you go online to sri.com, you will see that our logo has been adjusted to a special 75th anniversary year logo, which will exist just this year. And that sort of extends to all of our collateral. Anything SRI you see anywhere this year is going to have that. That’s how we’re celebrating, but you know what? We will get a lot more eyeballs that way than we would add an anniversary celebration in a closed room with a limited number of people. So when you think about bang for buck, and when you think about long-term impact and long-term value, it’s interesting because the pandemic has, I shudder to say, served us well in that purpose, in that regard.
Brian Erickson:
And you could argue that things like anniversary parties and events are largely brand marketing activities. And it sounds like a lot of the emphasis has shifted to performance marketing activities, which is something we’ve heard from a number of folks. I’m sure that brand marketing will come back and bounce back, as people become a little bit more comfortable with the business environment and the outlook, but I think it has made folks question some of the value of how their budgets are allocated in the mix of where they’re spending on brand versus performance activities.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Absolutely, Brian. Without a doubt, I mean, for us this year, and I’m going to extend this year to this period in time, it’s really about no general PR and no general PR really points to the kind of activities around just general branding. Everything is campaign-specific. If there is not a specific campaign that ties to the sale or the showcasing of a specific product service mix, then we don’t do it. This is good because it means many things. It means that our messaging needs to be very, very targeted, more targeted now, even than before. It means that the content we deliver needs to have absolute substance and provide true value. And on one hand, you could argue that that was always the case. It was not like you were aiming for something else, but it’s even more important because the metrics you’re putting in place to measure the return on investment means that that campaign has to deliver, right? It has to deliver according to those metrics. So doing this, structuring specific campaigns this way, as opposed to general branding means that in the short-term, and then in the long-term, your customer will develop the trust in you. So we will build the trust in the customer. We will build customer recognition. And if that actually doesn’t translate to brand value, then I don’t know what does.
Brian Erickson:
Yeah, that’s very true. And it’s a very small silver lining in comparison to the downside of all of this. But as you mentioned, it is a positive to have to force focus and cut waste and spend time considering where you’re going to get the biggest impact and move the needle, both in terms of creation of value for your target audience and in terms of capturing that value as a company. Are there any tactics or marketing activities that you, maybe a year ago, right before this all set in, would have never really considered that stood out to you as big winners or surprising in terms of their effectiveness or in terms of their emphasis during the pandemic that tactically you feel made an impact?
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Absolutely, Brian. And as I think about them, they’re actually very simple. There’s no rocket science here, even though I work for an outfit of rocket scientists. When it comes to marketing, it’s one of the basic things that has become incredibly important are virtual inquiry forms to capture potential inquiries for our customers, who we traditionally would have met onsite, our site, or their site, but we just can’t do that, right? So this goes back to what I said earlier about the salespeople not being able to go out on sales calls. So virtual inquiry forms, which are either on our website or related to a specific digital campaign, related to a specific performance marketing activity have become sort of all-important.

The other aspect of all these things that I just touched on is SEO services. Companies and organizations typically will spend on SEO services, but I think now these are prioritized more than they ever were before because websites or online collateral really needs to improve their search engine rankings in order to take full advantage of increased customer views online, whether that’s B2BO or B2C, whatever it might be, so that they can then be led back to those virtual inquiry forms that I just talked about.

Online marketing budgets are upped to huge amounts to focus on campaigns. At SRI, where I work, we are, as I mentioned earlier, a tech shop, and just in the area, we’ve got several different divisions, which I won’t go in and talk about, but some of the themes that we are developing in our division of information and computing sciences really actually tie into sort of the way we envision the world will look like in a post-COVID environment. In other words, what is it that we are expecting out of computing systems to help us live and work in a new way or in a different way, or in a way that is efficient?

And so just wanting to touch on those briefly, at SRI, Bill Mark, who’s the Head of our Information and Computing Sciences Division, will talk about building systems that we trust, building human-centered, computer interaction, I.e. systems that understand us, and then using computation to understand ourselves. And I could go into examples of all of these, but that wasn’t your question. What I’m trying to get at here is that we don’t have the ability today to get into a room with the client and really talk about these and demonstrate these in a way that we did before.

And just with these three themes, actually, some of our biggest clients are overseas in Japan. We’ve got an initiative called the Nomura-SRI Innovation Center, which actually brings these technologies, Silicon Valley technologies, with these specific themes to corporate Japan. The reason I mention this as an example is because our Japanese customers really value being in the room with us. Language issues, perhaps, or other things. They really value that interaction, but this is something that we just can’t do. So again, what we have been focusing on is building digital campaigns, video campaigns, infographics campaigns, to really demonstrate to them what these technologies are. And I think that is going to stay in this post COVID environment.
Brian Erickson:
That’s pretty cool. So, interesting. The way you speak about some of the trends and what’s forward-looking, they’re almost philosophical in terms of our relationship with technology, right? In terms of building systems that we can trust. And at the same time trying to come to terms with the fact that the systems have to understand us really well, and we have to trust them. And what was the third piece of that there? Sorry, I forgot.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
That’s fine. So we had basically building systems that we trust, we had building systems that understand us, and then using computation to understand ourselves. And I can give you examples of each because I know they overlap, but they’re all a little bit different in focus.
Brian Erickson:
Yes. That’s very interesting to ponder the philosophical aspects of technology that’s becoming as powerful as it is.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Yeah. So many of us tend to think, okay, so technology is the phone and they’re right, it is the phone. And the phone has come a long way in its evolution, right? From those first sort of flip phones and things that we used to have, but building systems that we trust, when you think about yourself in a car, and I have this dashboard that is talking to me, we do a lot of this. We’ve done a lot of this work in the automobile industry, vertical at SRI International, where we use our conversational AI methodology in the dashboard of a car. But today, when you think about that, it’s like, “okay, so I’m going to tell the assistant, Siri or whoever it is, to pull up this podcast, or this piece of music, or directions to such-and-such restaurant”, but you have to be very precise and very specific in terms of giving that information in absolutely the correct way to the machine in order for the machine to give you the right answer.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
And oftentimes it doesn’t happen. So it’ll give you the wrong answer because you didn’t direct it the right way. So building systems that we trust, we do a lot of work in deep fakes and you know, that that’s all technology and, but there’s a big problem out there with fake news and provenance, this issue of how do we know that this information comes from where it says it came from, right? And using computation to understand ourselves, we use a lot of our speech analytics and video analytics to monitor classroom situations, classroom environments. We do a lot of this with SRI Education to understand whether the teacher is really interacting well with the student, or in a work setting, is the team actually collaborating well? We do a lot of analysis then develop models to determine this, to continually improve the quality of that collaboration. So yes, those are just some examples.
Brian Erickson:
We could certainly have a, I think, very lengthy and in-depth conversation about the philosophy of some of the approaches to technology. And I would love to do that at some point. I guess, on the marketing side, how would you say that these trends in technology are affecting marketers on an individual level? Let’s say, other brand marketers in the technology industry right now, what would you say is important for them to really keep in mind if you had to give one piece of advice?
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Yeah, absolutely. So the one thing to really consider, and I think I have personally learned this over the years, working at different technology organizations, large and small. Technologists and scientists are brilliant, completely brilliant. Really masters of what they do, but from a marketing or a storytelling point of view, completely… Okay, and this is a generalization, but oftentimes completely inarticulate in terms of speaking about this work that they do, that is so brilliant, right? So as marketers, we really need to help them tell their story, right? We really need to help them create the story narrative without doing two things, creating fiction, we’re not fiction writers here, and without dumbing it down so that the next person can understand. This is incredibly important. And I want to use these words: don’t dumb it down. Because oftentimes as marketers, we’ll go and say, “Hey, it’s like the layperson, or the consumer, or the customer, whoever the customer might be, is not going to understand it. So let me explain it.”
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
And we end up dumbing things down. This is wrong, wrong, wrong, because the technologists, in order to sell their product, their service, they need the technical explanation, right? That is the value that they are bringing to the end customer. And that has to be translated. The problem, or the issue is from the technologist’s standpoint, that they’re too technical in their explanation. So oftentimes, most of the time, you can’t understand. You meaning the layperson, oftentimes the buyer or the customer, be he or she, the head of a company or the decision-maker is a layperson, right? So the story narrative has to be developed such that it meets both aspects. I.e. It really explains the technology without dumbing it down, but it uses language tools to make it meaningful, right? So put that into an example, in a video, let’s say, an example of what that looks like.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
And I’m in my head thinking of an example of a video that we created for a virus, drug discovery platform, I should say, a drug discovery platform that helps inject certain substances into molecules, okay? And keeps others out. That’s a very simplistic way of saying it, but it’s like, how do you describe that? We created a video and used an example, a metaphor, in an animation of a bouncer at a nightclub, letting some people in, in keeping others out. So while it might be hard to understand this in terms of the way the molecule reacts to the drug, it is very easy to understand a bouncer keeping some people out and letting some people in, right? And you can do this in a visual context. So don’t make a video which has talking heads, trying to talk through the issue, but use the visuals to tell the story, use the animation to illustrate.

That’s just one example. I could go into so many different kinds of content, but really what I’m trying to say is, as marketers, we really have to try and do our best to get into the head of the technologist, to explain the workings of that thought process to the customer, but without taking away from the core content.
Brian Erickson:
I like that a lot. And you use the word translate. And I think it really is a very literal form of translation, right? Where you have somebody who’s spent so long thinking about a product, or a feature, or a service, right. And you have to translate features into benefits into problems. If you look at why, how, what sort of framework, like Simon Sinek’s framework there, people want to understand how something works and what specifically makes it tick and what it does, but first they need to understand why they should care about it. And I think it’s just framing it from their perspective. And I think that’s a really great and astute observation about you shouldn’t dumb things down. You need to present the information in a way that’s relevant to a different audience that doesn’t necessarily mean that they can’t, or won’t grasp it. It just might mean that they are looking at it from a different perspective. So that’s, I think, very astute.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Absolutely, and I’m glad you mentioned Simon Sinek because it’s examples of people like him and Dale Carnegie. Dale Carnegie, it’s like the Bible, I think for marketing and sort of taking that content and presenting it for the needs of the audience. I mean, we’re narcissistic creatures, whether we like it or not, whether we’re trying to be, or not, everything in my life is from my perspective. It’s about me. It’s about the world around me, how it impacts me, how I impact it, okay? But it’s me, myself, and I. So if you, as a marketer, can take that information and present it to me in a manner that makes sense to me, hey, we’re going to strike a deal.
Brian Erickson:
Yeah. I think it’s just, you have to accept human nature. So for folks that maybe are in the job market currently, and I know unemployment has gone up, it’s gone down, it’s gone sideways. Who knows where it’ll go next, I hope it continues to decline, but there are many folks in our field in marketing and in the digital sphere who find themselves as free agents searching for jobs right now. And given that advice of not dumbing it down and properly translating perspective, how can individuals seeking roles in marketing position themselves for success and communicate their skill sets properly.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Yeah, Brian, that is a great question. And I’m really glad you asked it because many of us have this mindset of, “Oh my gosh, I’m out of a job right now.” Or, “Woe is me, what am I going to do?” As marketers, I think we are so valuable because we have real skill sets that we have acquired through all the years or days or weeks, whatever it might be, that we’ve been at this job, career, profession, right? So I would say, go back to your skillset and utilize it. What is it that you can do for a company, small or large, that they had just fired someone else for? Right? They have just downsized. They no longer have a budget, et cetera. What is it that you can do? And it involves a bit of work. It involves a bit of research to see what their needs are and how they can better grow their customer base or reach their goal through this specific skill set that you have.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Many of us who have, especially those who have been employed by companies, when we find ourselves out of work, we are so afraid of the idea of being a freelancer or a contractor, or working on a consultant basis. Like, “oh my gosh, how do I do that? Where do I start? I don’t know if clients…” It can be done. You have video skills, you’ve got digital marketing skills. You’ve got whatever it is that you might have, these are skills that you have that somebody else needs. So what project can you create first and then propose to a specific company and pitch them? We’re storytellers, okay? The nature of what we do is communication. So go pitch, go talk about it. And then do it. Be the operational person. I say this, especially because many people in the marketing field have grown to be managers.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
And while that’s wonderful, what often happens when you become a manager is that you stop actually being the doer and you become more of the director. And while there is a place for that in a bigger organization, when you find yourself out of work, then people, by people I mean organizations, will want to look to hire you for the actual skill that you provide rather than the ability to manage other people to do it, right? So go back to that core skill set.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
If you find that you need to learn more, update it, and you don’t have to go to school to do this. There’s plenty online that you can dig into to learn more, increase your skill set and so on and so forth. And create projects, practice, go pitch them. Because again, to underscore the fact that organizations that have just laid off people, downsized departments, put people out of work because of resources. They still need to sell. They still need to market. It’s just that they have limited resources. So if they’re going to spend those dollars, they’re going to spend it on the doer and not the manager. So go do, if that makes sense.
Brian Erickson:
That’s some great advice there and very consistent in terms of looking from somebody else’s perspective and looking from a company’s perspective rather than your own of needing a job, right? Look at the skills you have as features and the problems that they have, and find the benefits of your skills for them.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Absolutely.
Brian Erickson:
So, great. Well, Reenita, thanks so much for taking the time to talk with me today. Very much enjoyed the conversation.
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
And likewise, what can I say? I could go on talking with you all day, but I know that you don’t have the time and…
Brian Erickson:
We’ve got to get out there and do, right?
Reenita Malhotra Hora:
Exactly. We got to get out there and do. Develop that proof of concept and help them grow. If you do feel like connecting in the days to come and sharing any more insights or asking any more questions, I’d love to have a conversation. You can reach me through sort of the usual social media channels out there. I’m on Clubhouse, I am on LinkedIn, yep. I would love to do a chat room in Clubhouse with anyone who’s interested and LinkedIn, Twitter, and certainly Instagram also from my personal pet peeve, you can find me on Instagram as Reeny Mal, R-E-E-N-Y-M-A-L, and Reenita on the others.
Brian Erickson:
Wonderful. Well, thank you so much for the wonderful conversation. This is Brian Erickson with Cardwell Beach. Thanks again for listening. And please make sure to check back for more senior marketers sharing their perspectives on what marketing will look like in a post-COVID-19 world.

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